Arts Volunteers in Canada: Festivals

Spotlight

Festivals are big business in Toronto: for film only, there are at least 70 annual festivals, represented by their own dedicated association; TIFF and NXNE rival Cannes and SXSW; Toronto Fringe draws over 90,000 people a year to watch over 150 un-juried theatre productions; Toronto Downtown Jazz Festival presents around 350 gigs at 40 locations (and has “been blessed with over 60,000 hours contributed by volunteers” since 1987); and the 10-day Pride celebrations are organised and run by over 2,000 volunteers, who even get their own dedicated website.

I’m looking here at 3 long-running, well-developed and well-documented Toronto-based volunteer programmes: a large arts centre that produces multiple summer festivals, a world-famous film festival and a civic-minded multidisciplinary arts festival.

This is part 3 of a series of 4 posts on arts volunteers in Canada.

Harbourfront Centre

Harbourfront Centre is a multi-venue arts centre that present over 4,000 events each year, many of them as part of festivals. It also runs the Power Plant, a contemporary art gallery, World Stage, an annual season of contemporary performance, and the International Festivals of Authors. Approximately 2,000 volunteers contribute their time and efforts. They are involved in many ways, from greeting visitors to filming events, helping with workshops and preparing materials for arts and crafts activities. Due to the size of the team, some volunteers also provide support to other volunteers, especially at busy periods, from on-site registration and schedule information to coordination and management.

Volunteers receive benefits according to their level of commitment: Volunteer Contributor, below 60 hours a year; Volunteer Enthusiast, over 60 hours a year; and Volunteer Leader, over 60  hours a year in a position of responsibility such as committee member, trainer or team leader. Shared benefits include free return on public transport for each shift, a volunteer recognition party, a regular newsletter and a reference letter. Additional benefits for different volunteer levels range from complimentary tickets to staff discounts on the Centre’s shop, invitation to official receptions and access to reciprocal attractions. Volunteers who contribute over 60 hours a year also receive a photo ID access pass.

Harbourfront Centre is celebrating its 40th anniversary in 2014 and the volunteer programme itself has been running for 30 years. The latest Volunteer e-Newsletter available (produced by a volunteer sub-committee) gives a few figures about Harbourfront’s volunteer programme: in 2013, volunteers completed 7,346 volunteer shifts and contributed 31,122 hours, which translates to approximately $540,900 in-kind contribution. Ages range from 16 to 80+, and the top-contributing volunteer clocked over 900 hours last year.

Another kind of volunteers: Harbourfront Centre auditions for Dachschund UN, presented in 2013

Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF)

TIFF is the “leading public film festival in the world, screening more than 300 films from 60+ countries every September”. In 2012, it “featured 147 world premieres (and attracted) over 300 attending filmmakers, 4,280 industry delegates, 1,200 accredited media and over 400,000 public attendees”. Since 2010, it also operates its own venue and present a year-round programme of films, talks, exhibitions and industry services.

About 2,500 people volunteered for TIFF in 2013, a number that grows each year and include many returning volunteers, who have access to positions of higher responsibility. The programme is fiercely competitive and selection is based on a lengthy application – including 3 references – but the rewards are appealing: for each shift completed, volunteers get a voucher that they can exchange for a screening ticket. Roles range from red carpet coordinator to Q&A assistant, venue manager and plenty of behind-the-scene opportunities. In 2010, the estimated economic impact of the value of labour of volunteer hours was over $1 million.

To show its commitment to volunteers, TIFF has created a series of “Volunteer Stories” videos highlighting the diversity of motivations.

Cineplex, the Volunteer Programme Sponsor, also produces an annual trailer screened before each fim to publicly thank all festival volunteers.

Video: 2011 TIFF Volunteer Trailer by Cineplex, Volunteer Program Sponsor. Many more (excellent) trailers are available on Cineplex’s website.

It is worth noting that TIFF also recruits a surge of paid seasonal workers at festival time, selected through an annual Job Fair.

Luminato Festival

Created in 2007 to foster civic pride, spur economic growth and support artistic excellence, Luminato Festival is a 10-day annual multidisciplinary festival that has, to date, commissioned over 66 new works of art and featured 7,500 artists from 40 countries. About 500 volunteers fulfill a variety of roles each year, from Ambassadors to Team Leaders, Arts Marketing and Administrative Volunteers.

The festival has developed two teams that fit particularly well with its principles of “Collaboration, Accessibility, Diversity and Transformation”: the CultureLink Team and the Youth Volunteer Photography Team.

CultureLink is a settlement agency that helps newcomers to find employment, understand the local culture and “link the new with the old”. They have partnered with Luminato since 2010 to offer a mentored volunteering experience to new Canadians. 15 mentors and over 50 newcomers were matched in 2013, as detailed in a CultureLink post-festival newsletter that features enthusiastic participants’ testimonies. Organised in mentoring circles, they complete a total of 30 volunteer hours together, before and during the festival, to develop language and cultural competency skills as well as provide information to festival-goers.

The Youth Volunteer Photography Team is open to budding photographers aged 14-18 who are supervised and mentored by professional or pro-am photographers. The festival provides digital cameras if required and arranged an exhibition of the youth photographers’ work at the Toronto Lomography gallery.

The video below was produced during the 2013 Luminato Festival by the Volunteer Programme partner, Manulife Financial. Their contribution to their “signature cause” is detailed in a previous post on Funding for the Arts in Canada.

5 Questions to… Rebecca Cotter, Water-on-Wheels

5 questions to...

Water on Wheels (WOW) provides mobile water refill stations to outdoor events in Ontario and further. It was created by Rebecca Cotter, Toronto-based event planner and instructor of special event management, and as we were chatting about industry trends and the joys and sorrows of teaching, I got to ask her 5 questions about this genius invention.


1. How did you start WOW?

I got the concept from my experience working at Downsview Park (in Toronto), putting on concerts and festivals every weekend, and standing in the field after everyone’s gone and contemplating the garbage that each event generated – more garbage than anyone has ever seen in their life. That’s what you’re left with when people go home after having a good time. And a lot of it was plastic bottles.

As I was responsible for managing the full logistics of site cleaning and recycling, I was wondering how to make it more efficient. The bottles often still had beverage in them, and you pay by weight for site cleaning, so the bill was heavy!

I did some research and came up with the concept: the Water on Wheels stations connected to a tap water source. I got the first station built in 2010 and started with a sketchy website.

At the moment, the legislation is becoming stricter about waste, and there’s a very active push to ban commercially packaged water, for example in schools and on municipal properties. People are more and more aware that tap water is high quality water, and that bottled water is environmentally costly. There’s a trend to carry your own reusable bottle. So I’ve been fortunate, because my idea came up at the right time.

WOW at Luminato Festival,  Distillery District, Toronto

WOW at Luminato Festival, Distillery District, Toronto

2. What’s up for you now?

This year will be big – it took me 4 years to get there. When I launched, I knew I was a bit ahead of the social trend. I always have a booth at trade events, and we generate a lot of interest, but people still often think that they can’t afford it.

We’re present at over 100 events a year, mainly in Ontario, where we rent out one or several water stations. This year, we have also started manufacturing and selling our stations across North America.

I started with the rationale to eliminate waste, but event planners are also concerned about how much it costs. Our stations are available to rent, and we’re priced competitively, but when you add other factors, especially transport to places in the US, it can end up being not so cheap. It is certainly cheaper to get a food vendor to sell bottles – but not if you factor in the environmental and human cost.

Selling stations is a new development and it works out better for some clients, but we’ll continue to rent out, to downtown festivals, one-off events etc.

WOW Water Table

WOW Water Table

3. How much time do you spend on WOW?

I always ran my business in addition to my other occupations (previously a full-time event manager and a part-time event planning instructor, now a full-time teacher and part-time event contractor). In the high season, May to September, it’s pretty much full-time, but mainly on alternative hours – evenings and weekends.

I’m the owner, and I hire between 8 and 10 part-time people for the summer season, to drive,  unload, hook up the station to a source, and stay with the unit on site.

4. Concretely, how does it work?

We usually connect to a fire hydrant or outdoor hose tap. Sometimes we need a permit to access water, ranging around $100-$150, which includes use of water. It all depends on the municipality, but I’ve never had a situation where clients had to pay for metered water.

We provide a meter reading to all our clients to show them how much water was used during their event, which generates very positive PR. We can estimate how many bottles were saved or diverted.

A regular bottle fills up in 10 seconds. If every tap is continuously used on one station, we can fill up 1,200 to 1,500 bottles an hour.

We’ve done events from 100 to 100,000 audience members, and for the bigger events, we provide 3 to 4 stations. A typical outdoor concert means 25 to 30K bottles refilled a day – smaller community events range from 3-5K bottles.

Refill station

Refill station

5. Apart from saving on waste, what are the benefits for audiences and event organisers?

The research we conducted shows that without the stations, ⅓ of people who refill would be motivated to buy a $5 bottle. Clearly not everyone who refills for free would buy a bottle of water. Actually, if you had $5 to spend at an outdoor event, would you buy beer or water? Most people would choose beer – so without free water, the cost of not having WOW is what you would pay in First Aid & Emergency services, to take care of people who are dehydrated, throw up, pass out… We worked closely with people in first aid services and were able to correlate the evidence: more water = less First Aid.

We did the VELD electronic music festival in Downsview Park in 2012, at the hottest time of the year. The grass was so burnt that it looked like a beach.  We had a line-up from morning to night, 300 people deep, and we refilled 55-60K bottles in 2 days. Under such conditions, people can get severely dehydrated, and it’s the event planner’s responsibility to ensure their safety.

It’s really all about the audience experience. The concept has now been around long enough that people expect it. If it’s not there, it would be a disappointment. We get a lot of interaction on Twitter, people check if we’ll be where they’re going. That’s actually our best marketing device – after having a station at an event: if ticket holders want us at their event, then they’ll request us on Twitter.

Some clients work with their sponsors to brand our stations. They might give out refillable bottles, provide extra staff wearing a branded T-shirt… that’s a very good way to offset the rental fee and a very good example of sponsor activation. It shows real value for the sponsor, because  we can actually measure how many people interacted with us, and it’s a meaningful interaction: when people have been in the sun all day, they’re really grateful for the chance to drink some fresh, cold, free water. We’re everybody’s best friend!

Water on a summer festival day

Water on a summer festival day

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For more about Water on Wheels, visit the brand new website and follow them on Twitter.

Summer Summary 1: Art Everywhere

Programming

August is drawing to a close and to my horror I realise that I haven’t done much blogging this summer. I have a good excuse: I was away, on a working holiday trip to Europe. So to lessen my guilt of not producing much content for Art of Festivals, here’s a summary of what I’ve seen, heard and done this past month. I’ll start here with my encounters with free music and art in unusual settings.
(All photos by @artoffestivals, click on images to view a larger version in a new tab).

Part 1: Art Everywhere

Manchester Jazz Festival

I started my trip with 10 days of live contemporary jazz at the 18th annual Manchester Jazz Festival, allowing me to reunite with old friends and discover new and unexpected gems. There were lots of free gigs on offer, at the rate of 3 or 4 a day, and the paying gigs are usually priced at no more than £15. The festival uses a variety of venues and spaces throughout the city centre, from the “Festival Teepee”, a huge tent originally commissioned by Manchester International Festival, to the 300-year-old St Ann’s Church, the recently renovated Band on the Wall (which eventful 200-year history as a pub, then cinema, then live music venue can be found here) and the Grade-II listed Midland Hotel, where Rolls is rumoured to have met Royce.

Attending the festival – and not working it, as I had done for 3 years – was a great reminder of what it’s like to be on the other side. The festival team might be solving a crisis backstage – the next band is stuck in traffic, some volunteers haven’t showed up, or the horrendous weather is threatening to ruin the show – but nothing transpires stage-side: the gig starts bang on time, the sound is perfectly balanced, the performers are highly skilled and engaging, and the only real question remaining is whether or not to have that second glass of Pimm’s.

My festival highlight: spending lots of time with the great guys from Trio Journal Intime (Sylvain Bardiau – trumpet, Matthias Mahler – trombone, Frederic Gastard – bass saxophone), rescuing said bass saxophone from airline mismanagement hell and being completely blown away by their ‘Lips on Fire’ Jimmy Hendrix-inspired gig. Here’s a live performance video for further proof:

Yorkshire Sculpture Park

After my favourite festival, I went to my favourite sculpture park – not that I know that many others, but I can’t imagine that they can come any finer than this: 500 acres of landscaped park in the heart of Yorkshire, with a huge collection of works (featuring Barbara Hepworth, Henry Moore, Anthony Caro, Andy Goldsworthy, James Turrell, Richard Long, Antony Gormley, Helen Escobedo – and so many more that it’s probably best to check the full list here), dotted here and there in the meadows, woods and formal gardens. The indoor galleries host infallibly exceptional temporary exhibitions: this time Yinka Shonibare MBE, on my previous visit Jaume Plensa. As for most cultural institutions in the UK, entrance is free, you only pay for parking; and there are many events, workshops and guided visits on offer for all ages.

Yorkshire Sculpture Park, summer 2013

Yorkshire Sculpture Park, summer 2013

HaHa Bridge, Brian Fell

HaHa Bridge, Brian Fell

Ten Seated Figures, Magdalena Abakanowicz

Ten Seated Figures, Magdalena Abakanowicz

Buddha, Niki de Saint Phalle

Buddha, Niki de Saint Phalle

Wind Sculpture, Yinka Shonibare MBE

Wind Sculpture, Yinka Shonibare MBE

Panopticons

Panopticon (noun): structure, space or device providing a comprehensive or panoramic view

The following day, I set off with friends in the other direction for more outdoor sculpture fun. The Panopticons are a major public art commissioning project, meant to create new landmarks in the rural setting of East Lancashire. All four structures were designed by different architects and/or artists, working both as focal points and viewpoints and drawing from the local heritage. They were completed in 2006-2007. I have already written about the Panopticon project in my post about the research project Why Art Works, so I wanted to see them for myself.

Travelling in style in a red, white and chrome Triumph 2000, we created a public Google Map and followed the route suggested in this article by Nick Hunt, Director of Mid-Pennine Arts, the commissioning agency behind this cultural regeneration effort. We only managed to score 2 ½ out of 4, mainly because we spent so much time chatting about our impressions, taking photos, getting lost, and thoroughly enjoying ourselves.

The two structures we experienced close-up are Colourfields, a converted cannon battery site set in the very Victorian Corporation Park, and Atom, perched on top of the hill in Wycoller Country Park. In both instances, we walked in beautiful landscaped settings, taking in the sights, enjoying the fresh air and reflecting on the shaping of nature by culture.

While we were determined that we would make it to Singing Ringing Tree, we had to give it a miss when we realised that we were only a few miles away from Bronte Country (i.e. the likelihood of a good pub). And the remaining half Panopticon? That’s Halo, which we spotted from the motorway on the way back to Manchester.

Mid-Pennine Arts’ website states that the Panopticons “were designed to attract visitors into the countryside to enjoy the stunning landscapes that this delightful area has to offer”. This cunning plan clearly worked, as there are very few other reasons that could have influenced us to head to Blackburn and Burnley, and I’m immensely glad that we did!

Atom, Panopticon, Wycoller Country Park

Atom, Panopticon, Wycoller Country Park
Design by Peter Meacock with Katarina Novomestska and Architecture Central Workshop.

View from inside Atom

View from inside Atom

View outside Atom

Art Everywhere

I was lucky to be in England just in time for Art Everywhere – self-described as “A Very Big, Big Art show”. It’s a nationwide initiative swapping billboard ads for art posters, using the collections of the Tate (Modern and Britain) and other museums and galleries.

The exhibition ran from 12 to 25 August, featuring 57 different British works of art across 22,000 poster sites. I spotted quite a few in train stations in Sheffield and Manchester and all over London.

It’s public art in more than one way: it was part-funded by the public, through a crowdfunding campaign raising over £30,000, with rewards such as badges, bags, T-shirts and framed prints; the works were chosen by public voting, out of a longlist of over 100 artworks; and interaction was encouraged via a photography competition. It is estimated that 90% of the UK population will see at least one of these billboards during the course of the campaign.

The interactive map helps getting a sense of the huge scale of this project, and this video shows a few works in their newly found context.

The Art of Weather

Programming

The Manchester Jazz Festival just ended this past weekend (on the flamboyantly playful sounds of Journal Intime, a French trio featuring a mighty bass saxophone) and despite fears of flooding, the damp Mancunian weather didn’t succeed in deterring music fans from their annual rejoicings.

Is it because the British weather is a little bit more awful than anywhere else that Britons are so obsessed with it? “Talking about the weather” is apparently the number 1 self-identified national trait (according to the same poll, other top qualities include “being overly polite”, “gossiping with neighbours over the garden fence” and a “fondness for mowing the lawn”, painting a charming portrait of a nation).

While manners, back-stabbing and gardening would all make great themes for a festival, for the purpose of this post, I will focus on what really matters to most people, looking at a few artistic explorations that embrace the elements.

How it feels

On my very first visit to Tate Modern in 2003, I came across one of the Turbine Hall site-specific installations by chance, and was transfixed by pretty much everything about it: the space itself, for its scale and the sheer ambition of repurposing it; the way the artist invested it with deceptively simple means; and the public’s joyous abandon of museum etiquette.

The Weather Project, by Olafur Eliasson, featured a giant sun, hanging high at the far end of the cavernous Turbine Hall and radiating a warm and soft orange glow. Looking up, the ceiling seemed to shimmer, just like on a hot summer day.

Weather Project, Olafur Eliasson, 2003, Tate Modern

On further examination, the sun was in fact a half circle of light, reflected to form a full figure, and the mirrored ceiling was not made of a single piece, but covered in hundreds of slats, creating a vibrating illusion. A light mist added to the heat-wavering summer feeling, so powerfully suggestive that the best way to enjoy it was to lay down and bask in it, just like in a park or on a beach.

In this short video interview below, the artist talks about the Weather Project and another experiment on perception, Your Blind Passenger (2010), a long tunnel with very limited visibility and changing levels of light, reproducing extreme fog conditions. He explains his interest in creating collective experiences where people can explore social constructs – such as “the weather” – and define their own singularity as part of a collectivity.

The Weather Project is as much about how we relate to the weather, real or imagined, as it is about the way the museum setting – yet another social construct – shapes our perception and understanding. The artist thought carefully about the viewer’s experience, even choosing himself the marketing messages to control the visitors’ expectations, as explained on the Tate’s website.

This emotionally charged review in the Telegraph is a good starting point to delve further into the Weather Project experience, and a few copies of the exhibition catalogue are still circulating (US / UK).

How it sounds

Music critic Alex Ross, author of the excellent The Rest is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century, has published a new collection of essays under the title Listen to This, exploring many different genres, periods and artists, from Schubert to Björk, with the same attention to context and reception.

One of these texts, originally featured in the New Yorkerfollows composer John Luther Adams on his musical journeys, as far as Alaska. Adams is passionately interested in environmental questions and his compositions and books are based on his research on climate and natural phenomena, as he explains in this short video portrait.

The Place Where You Go To Listen, an immersive data-based light-and-sound installation (also used as a title for a creative writing piece and a book on the ecology of music), is located within the University of Alaska’s Museum of the North. It is described as such on their website: “(an) ever-changing musical ecosystem (that) gives voice to the rhythms of daylight and darkness, the phases of the moon, the seismic vibrations of the earth and the dance of the aurora borealis, in real time.”

There is nothing romantic or figurative about Adams’ notion of the weather, as he declares himself in the video above: “I’m not interested in telling you a story”. The music of the world is what you hear when you listen.

Whilst The Place Where You Go To Listen is, in a way, composed by nature, John Luther Adams uses a variety of compositional devices in his other works. Many audio excerpts are available on his online catalogue and on the Audio Guide of Listen to Thisfor a more recent creation, this video excerpt of the première of Inuksuit at the Armory gives yet another flavour of John Luther Adams’ sense of sound-in-space.

How it looks

The art of weather can veer from the collective experience of the social body to a focus on the singularity of the listener; it can also be purely contemplative, creating a safe distance between the viewer and the elements.

Stormy skies, hazy mornings and glowing sunsets abound in Romantic and Impressionist paintings, and on this occasion I’ve discovered a fantastic free resource, WikiPaintings, a non-for-profit Arts Encyclopedia online since December 2011 that already contains over 100,000 works. William Turner and Monet are safe bets for expressive skies, and a quick search on series returns the following results.

William Turner - Landscapes Series

William Turner – Landscapes Series – WikiPaintings.com

Claude Monet - Houses of Parliament

Claude Monet – Houses of Parliament Series – WikiPaintings.com

Land Art also provides a fairly obvious catalogue of weather-related works, from Nancy Holt’s Sun Tunnels to Walter de Maria’s Lightning Field. Although these works happen in situ, and not on canvas, distance is almost ineluctable, due the number of conditions needed to experience them in person.

James Turrell - Skyspaces

James Turrell – Skyspaces

On the other hand, James Turrell has circumvented this inherent contradiction of Land Art – which should be experienced on site, but realistically will mainly be encountered in a mediated form – by creating a replicable experience with his Skyspaces. The artist’s official website lists 47 such structures, dotted all around the world, all unique in shape, proportions and design, but providing a similar experience: an intense view of the sky, sublimating natural phenomenons such as sunrise, sunset and the passing of clouds.

Like Olafur Eliasson and John Luther Adams, James Turrell’s experiential art can be likened to a phenomenological approach, inviting the visitor to sharpen their focus, become conscious of their own consciousness and pay attention to the interrelation of the collective and the singular.

In other words, he is far from encouraging the weather chit-chat, and on the contrary is often quoted for saying:

I want to create an atmosphere that can be consciously plumbed with seeing like the wordless thought that comes from looking in a fire.

More elements

The weather in art is certainly a hot topic, and recent installations are playing in their own ways with storm, rain or wind. To explore more elemental works, from clouds, fog and snow to rainbows and midnight sun, here’s a nice top 10-type compilation of “art installations that imitate weather”.

Last but not least, the world’s only Festival of Weather, Art and Music (WAM) is taking place in Reading, England, in September 2013. Amongst scientific talks and sound installations, it most excitingly features a free “Weather Factory” event, a mass experiment pitching as many people as possible against one laptop to predict the weather using nearly 100-year old methods.

Jessica Dargo Caplan, Director of Education & Community Outreach, Luminato

5 questions to...

Jessica is Director of Education and Community Outreach at Luminato Festival and also oversees the Volunteer Programme, so I have had the great pleasure to work directly with her for the past six months. I’ve been wanting to ask her my “5 Questions” for a while, but given that we were both in the same festival boat, I know very well how busy she has been lately. She took it upon herself to rewrite and rearrange the questions in a fitting manner for a post-festival interview.

1. Luminato Festival’s Education & Community Outreach projects are very different year-to-year, but what are your programming principles?

As part of the festival’s core programming, our Education & Community Outreach projects reflect the Luminato Festival’s guiding principles of accessibility, diversity, collaboration and transformation, with a strong emphasis on the creative process, to ensure meaningful community engagement and authentic experiences.

2. The 2013 Luminato Festival just wrapped up on 23rd June – what was your favourite moment, the one that made it all worth it?

Getting the chance to see how our Education & Outreach project participants directly engage with our Festival artists. This year we worked very closely with the incredible Mark Morris Dance Group (MMDG) on L’Allegro Movement Project – an intergenerational dance initiative which involved young students from Winchester Junior Public School and Nelson Mandela Park Public School, as well as participants with the Toronto-based Dancing with Parkinson’s group. Together they explored the expressive possibilities of movement through the choreography and music from MMDG’s L’Allegro, il Penseroso ed il Moderato.

Five months of weekly workshops and rehearsals culminated in a final public performance on Wednesday June 19th at the Daniels Spectrum in Regent Park. This meaningful public performance, featuring the Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra and Chamber Choir, highlighted the impact the arts can have on improving the quality of life in both youth and adults.

The most magical moment for me was walking into the theatre right before the final dress rehearsal… seeing our dancers moving around nervously and enthusiastically in their bright and colourful costumes, while the Tafelmusik musicians tuned their instruments… just feeling this beautiful spirit of true artistic collaboration in the room was completely, and overwhelmingly, beautiful.

3. You’ve been at the head of the Education & Community Outreach department since the inaugural year of the Luminato Festival. What gets easier with time? And what doesn’t?

Juggling the work flow never seems to get any easier – it’s like childbirth… I forget how difficult the Festival season can be, but my work is incredibly rewarding so it’s worth the stress (and many sleepless nights!).

4. During this post-Festival period, what’s a typical day like right now?

There isn’t really a typical day — I spend much of my time in meetings with colleagues in the office and arts/community partners analyzing and reflecting on the projects and programs, process and outcomes. (The worst part is sorting through what seems like mountains of paperwork!) At the same time I start to transition into a major planning phase for next year’s Festival.

5. What other festival would you love to attend as audience member?

I would really like to get the chance to experience and learn more about some of the incredible outreach and creative learning projects in the UK and other parts of Europe. There are too many to list, but festivals like Manchester International Festival (which is going on right now), Latitude, Hay Festival, Ruhrtriennale and Augenblick Mal! are doing really interesting collaborations and progressive outreach work.

– – –

This year’s Education and Community Outreach projects also included Future Tastes of Toronto: At the Kids’s Table, a collaboration with performance company Mammalian Diving Reflex around kids and food (of which a trailer is available here, alongst other food-focused programming at other festivals); and School Days, a joint concert with musicians from the Arts & Crafts label and Regent Park School of Music students. A documentary about L’Allegro Movement Project filmed by a youth apprentice team during the Festival will be screened in November 2013 as part of the Regent Park Film Festival, Toronto’s “only free-of-charge community film festival”.

Luminato Festival returns for its 8th year in 2014, from 6th to 15th June.